Advising Appointment Update

In alignment with the campus directives regarding the precautions surrounding COVID-19, the Languages and Literatures academic advising offices are now physically closed.  Our Advisors remain available and will be offering academic advising appointments to students through zoom, phone call, or email.  Once you have scheduled your appointment in the online appointment system, your advisor will reach out to you via email with instructions on how to connect with them using zoom, phone call, or email. Resource FAQ for Students

HUM 2A. Topic: "Crime Without Punishment: Dostoevsky and Woody Allen" (4 Units)
CRN 47185 | Prof. Olga Stuchebrukhov | TR 3:10 - 4:30PM | 158 Olson (new classroom as of 4/3/2013)

This course will focus on Dostoevsky’s classic Crime and Punishment (1866) and its postmodernist interpretation in Woody Allen’s films, Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989), Match Point (2005), and Cassandra’s Dream (2007). In addition to these primary text and films, we will read Phaedra (1677) by Jean Racine that will help us contextualize the issues of crime and punishment and their aesthetic representation. Together with Mikhail Bakhtin’s ideas about art, these works will help us understand ideological and aesthetic aspects of Allen’s postmodernist shift from crime and punishment to crime without any punishment at all.

In taking this course, you will (1) Develop critical skills in reading, analyzing, and writing about literature and film; (2) Engage in comparative analysis of novel and film, novel and tragedy, Classicism, Realism, and Postmodernism; and (3) Gain general knowledge about Bakhtinian theory of polyphonic art.

GE credit (Old): ArtHum.
GE credit (New): ArtHum, World Cultures and WrtExp.

Format: Lecture 3 hours; Extensive Writing.

Texts:

  • Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment (Vintage, 1993)
  • Jean Baptiste Racine, et al., Iphigenia; Phaedra; Athaliah (Penguin Classics, 1964)

Note: HUM 2A can be repeated one time for credit if topic differs.

About the Instructor: Prof. Olga Stuchebrukhov is an associate professor in the department of German and Russian.


HUM 2B. Topic: "The Cultural History of the Blues" (4 Units)
CRN 62673 | Prof. Julia Simon | MWF 12:10 - 1:00PM | 26 Wellman

Click here to view the flyer for this course

The blues is a uniquely American musical genre. The history of the blues echoes the African-American experience, from the Delta to the industrialized north, from Mississippi to Chicago, Memphis, and beyond.  This course will combine cultural history with music appreciation to explore the history of the blues, looking at such figures as Son House, Robert Johnson, Bessie Smith, Muddy Waters, and B.B. King.  We will learn about the historical context that gave birth to the blues as well as learn about the musical structure of the blues, touching on chord progressions, bass lines and rhythms.  Finally, we will examine the impact of the blues on other genres, such as rock, R&B, jazz and rap.
 
Work for the course will consist of readings focused on the history of the blues and listening to music.  Students will write four reaction papers, complete an analytical assignment on lyrics and take quizzes, mid-term and final exams. 

GE credit (Old): ArtHum.
GE credit (New): ACGH, ArtHum, and WrtExp.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing.

Texts:

  • A Course Reader

Note: HUM 2B can be repeated one time for credit if topic differs.

About the Instructor: Prof. Julia Simon is a professor in the department of French and Italian.


HUM 15. Language and Identity: "Dropping the F-Bomb" (4 Units)
CRN 47186 | Prof. Eric Russell | TR 10:30 - 11:50AM | 216 Wellman

This course is designed to introduce you to basic principles of social science inquiry, data analysis, and writing through the exploration of taboo language, including insults, profanity, vulgarity, and expletives. Our discussions will center on a series of questions, including:
1.    What makes “bad language” bad? What sets a “bad word” apart from a neutral word meaning the exact same thing?
2.    Why do we say some words are inappropriate, whereas others are perfectly fine? Why is it acceptable to refer to “genitals” at a doctor’s office, but not use a more colorful or colloquial term? Why can a person be vilified for using one term for a particular ethnicity, whereas other terms are considered okay?
3.    Why is speech censored? Why do we bleep out words on television and the radio and is this effective?
4.    What can we learn about our values, expectations, fears and history by looking more closely at taboo language?
1.    How does looking at racial slurs or outdated language about race help us understand ethnic relations and tensions in our society?
2.    How does investigating words considered to be pejorative about a person’s sexual orientation enrich our views of sexuality and gender norms?
3.    What do taboo words that refer to women by way of their genitalia tell us about our expectations of women?
 
Objectives and goals
Throughout the quarter, you will meet the following objectives:
1.    Linguistic knowledge: you will learn to describe language using appropriate terminology and effectively present linguistic data.
2.    Analytical skills: you will describe data using appropriate terms and approaches; you will develop and test hypotheses about language use and linguistic behavior.
3.    Intellectual posture: you will adopt and apply objectivity with regard to language forms, opinions about language, and the description and analysis of linguistic behavior.

Furthermore, you are expected to hone your writing skills, focusing on form, rhetoric and style appropriate for the human and social sciences. You will apply themes from class lectures and readings to a question of personal interest in a final project and paper, demonstrating an ability to form coherent ideas and express these ideas effectively and appropriately.

GE credit (Old): ArtHum, Div and Wrt.
GE credit (New): ArtHum or SocSci and WrtExp.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing.

Texts:

  • No textbooks

About the Instructor: Prof. Eric Russell is an associate professor in the department of French and Italian.


HUM 250. Topic: "The Politics of Reproduction in the Early Modern World" (4 Units)
CRN 62674 | Prof. Ari Friedlander | M 3:10-6:00PM | 120 Voorhies

This special graduate seminar, funded by the Mellon Early Modern Research Initiative, will bring four leading scholars of early modern European history and culture from different disciplines to investigate various modes of
reproduction in the early modern world - including but not limited to intellectual, artistic, scientific, material, sexual, ideological, and political - in light of recent critical and theoretical scholarship in the humanities and social sciences. This interdisciplinary seminar is not only an exciting chance to study closely with a range of nationally renowned scholar-teachers, it is also a unique opportunity to learn how these cutting edge scholars assemble and develop a scholarly project, since all scholars will be teaching material from their current book projects.  Our guests will be: Jeffrey Masten (English, Northwestern), Katherine Paugh (History, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), David Glimp (English, University of Colorado-Boulder), and Barbara Fuchs (UCLA, Spanish & Portuguese and English).

The seminar format is as follows: students will read and discuss recent and in-progress work by our distinguished guests, each of whom will then visit with the seminar to discuss their current research and its relationship to its own field and to interdisciplinary scholarship.  The seminar sessions will explore connections across disciplines and modes of reproduction, asking questions like: What kinds of educational methods does the early modern Spanish empire use to produce and reproduce colonial subjects?  How did early modern England develop bio-political and governmental discourses in order to rationalize and manage its exploding population?  How might the practices and representations of midwifery in the early modern Atlantic relate to the production and reproduction of racial and gender hierarchies?  How can contemporary queer critical debates about kinship and marriage be brought to bear on the historically distant sex/gender system of the Renaissance?

This course is designed to appeal to students doing coursework as well as those preparing to write or writing dissertations.  Students doing coursework will have the opportunity to study the politics of reproduction across a broad cultural and geographical swath of early modern Europe and the Atlantic, while also receiving training in critical methodologies pertaining to the study of embodiment, gender, sexuality, empire, bio-politics, governmentality, literary history, and the history of medicine. Advanced graduate students will have a rare chance to learn from major scholars in the field how to envision and execute a compelling, complex, and complete scholarly project.  Students also have the option of taking this course for two or three hours of credit under the rubric of Humanities 298.  If you choose this option, please email Professor Friedlander so he can send you the CRN for the seminar.  Students who wish to audit unofficially are also welcome to do so, and should contact Professor Friedlander directly (arifriedlander AT ucdavis.edu) for details.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Texts:

  • Readings on SmartSite
  • Readings assigned by speakers

About the Instructor: Prof. Ari Friedlander is a visiting professor in the department of English.


HUM 298. Topic: "The Politics of Reproduction in the Early Modern World" (4 Units)
CRN @ see bottom of page | Prof. Ari Friedlander | M 3:10-6:00PM | 120 Voorhies

This special graduate seminar, funded by the Mellon Early Modern Research Initiative, will bring four leading scholars of early modern European history and culture from different disciplines to investigate various modes of
reproduction in the early modern world - including but not limited to intellectual, artistic, scientific, material, sexual, ideological, and political - in light of recent critical and theoretical scholarship in the humanities and social sciences. This interdisciplinary seminar is not only an exciting chance to study closely with a range of nationally renowned scholar-teachers, it is also a unique opportunity to learn how these cutting edge scholars assemble and develop a scholarly project, since all scholars will be teaching material from their current book projects.  Our guests will be: Jeffrey Masten (English, Northwestern), Katherine Paugh (History, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), David Glimp (English, University of Colorado-Boulder), and Barbara Fuchs (UCLA, Spanish & Portuguese and English).

The seminar format is as follows: students will read and discuss recent and in-progress work by our distinguished guests, each of whom will then visit with the seminar to discuss their current research and its relationship to its own field and to interdisciplinary scholarship.  The seminar sessions will explore connections across disciplines and modes of reproduction, asking questions like: What kinds of educational methods does the early modern Spanish empire use to produce and reproduce colonial subjects?  How did early modern England develop bio-political and governmental discourses in order to rationalize and manage its exploding population?  How might the practices and representations of midwifery in the early modern Atlantic relate to the production and reproduction of racial and gender hierarchies?  How can contemporary queer critical debates about kinship and marriage be brought to bear on the historically distant sex/gender system of the Renaissance?

This course is designed to appeal to students doing coursework as well as those preparing to write or writing dissertations.  Students doing coursework will have the opportunity to study the politics of reproduction across a broad cultural and geographical swath of early modern Europe and the Atlantic, while also receiving training in critical methodologies pertaining to the study of embodiment, gender, sexuality, empire, bio-politics, governmentality, literary history, and the history of medicine. Advanced graduate students will have a rare chance to learn from major scholars in the field how to envision and execute a compelling, complex, and complete scholarly project.  Students also have the option of taking this course for two or three hours of credit under the rubric of Humanities 298.  If you choose this option, please email Professor Friedlander so he can send you the CRN for the seminar.  Students who wish to audit unofficially are also welcome to do so, and should contact Professor Friedlander directly (arifriedlander AT ucdavis.edu) for details.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.  (S/U grading only)

Texts:

  • Readings on SmartSite
  • Readings assigned by speakers

About the Instructor: Prof. Ari Friedlander is a visiting professor in the department of English.

CRN @ - please see Prof. Friedlander to obtain the CRN for this class.